Pinterest Content Strategy Secrets

Pinterest boards content

English: Red Pinterest logo

Pinterest, the social platform for collecting, sharing, liking and commenting on of photos for personal “vision boards” is utterly engaging, absorbing, and yeah — addictive. New age gurus and Law of Attraction advocates recommend making collages of images that inspire you to visualize the future you want. This technique etches images into brain activity, triggering the power of the subconscious mind. They work. (So does meditation, sweat and tears.)

Using a similar strategy, users curate their favorite images more carefully than Facebook likes. When people pin items related to brands, for example, they care about content and how the image of the brand reflects upon them.

Here’s how I received instant followers, likes and comments and even a repin by Pinterest HQ:

1. Use creative titles for boards
One of my boards, “Bananas for Bakelite” features a personal addiction for vintage jewelry trends. Pinterest actually repinned a bakelitle purse. Find your unique passion and craft creative headlines and titles which speak to that theme. Always caption your images with cute sayings like, “Off with their heads” when posting images of furniture items like armchairs or thrones, for example. My board, “Armchair Warrior” is popular because it showcases unique images scoured from google, fab.com, jossandmain.com, the foundary and coolhunter.

2. Make captions personal
Under the same board, “Armchair Warrior,” I posted the ever-popular Eames chair and wrote “My boyfriend just bought a replica at __.” This was repinned and commented on — comments are not as common as repins. It requires more effort. Make captions descriptive and use keywords, too.

3. Follow popular users
This one is kind of obvious but it helps build traction and provides a rich experience to emulate. Notice what gets repinned, how often and by whom.

3. Post personal images
|Yes, I promoted my photography skills in an unconventional manner and created a relationship to my work by sharing it with strangers.It was worth it. I love Paris and can’t hold back!

4. Showcase your work/portfolio
Pinterest is an optimal place for designers and creatives to amplify their voice by showcasing their talent. It’s a bit more difficult to pin website redesigns if you’re a content strategist…but you can get creative and post clips, sites you have worked on and elements of design you incorporated. I’ve posted a board called Edgy Infographics. Woking with designers and creatives, we constantly required clickable images for engaging sites and specific data points to capture a B2B audience. Infographics work. Pinning images on Pinterest can help centralize reference materials, clippings and other items to inspire or inform your work.

5. Pay it forward
When you are a true cheerleader to others, it can have a boomerang effect (regardless of timing). I’ve promoted a few artists, and a jewelry designer with a board called, “Works of Art(ists).” It’s not in-your-face marketing. That’s what I like about Pinterest – there’s a sweet spot between passion and promotion.

6. Create a conversation
Think about posting books you have read or music you love and captioning them as mini reviews. Spark engagement by expressing common themes. Pose questions, experiment and have fun! I networked with a book publisher on Pinterest. How awesome is that?!

What’s worked for you?

Brand Indentity Crisis?

Branding is key. We all know it shapes the voice, tone and personality of every channel and every layer of your story.

Larger companies seem to embrace a fractured approach to establishing their forward-facing voice since there are many departments, properties, divisions and the list goes on. Startups have mastered this aspect of branding strategy because they don’t have as much red tape and  employees tend to rally together during a company’s embryonic phase. It’s fresh, new, collaborative and exciting.

Brand makeovers are not. As a content strategist, I have to find clever and tangible ways to position a brand and engage various audiences. So if you don’t have a branding team or branding strategists, what do you do?

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